Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)

Description

 

ECOWAS was set up to foster the ideal of collective self-sufficiency for its member states. As a trading union, it is also meant to create a single, large trading bloc through economic cooperation.It is now considered one of the pillars of the African Economic Community.

The ECOWAS was established via the signature of the treaty of Lagos on May 28th 1975.

Comprised of 15 member-states, ECOWAS encompasses 5,112,903 sqkm as well as about 340 million people. Its combined GDP reaches $734.8 billion.

ECOWAS aims at creating a borderless region, with free movement, access to efficient education and health systems.

A handful of member-states within ECOWAS, namely, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone also plan on creating a common currency called the Eco.

It also serves a peacekeeping purpose in the region, which allows its member-states to serenely prosper and show some of the biggest growth rates in Africa.



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East African Community (EAC)

Description

The East African Community (EAC) is the regional intergovernmental organisation of the Republics of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, the United Republic of Tanzania, and the Republic of Uganda, with its headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania.

The EAC treaty was signed on November 30th 1999 and took effect on July 7th 2000. It originally involved three founding Partner States: Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

Rwanda and Burundi later on signed the treaty on Jun 18th 2007, and became full members on July 1st 2007.

As of 2009, the EAC accounted for more than 130 million people, a land area of 1.82 million sqkm and a GDP of $74.5 billion.

In July 1st 2010, a common market was launched, leading to free movement of labour, capital, goods and services within the EAC.

The East African Community is currently working on taking their alliance one step further by creating a common currency. Eventually, the goal would be to unite not only economically, but also politically, by creating an East African Federation.

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Map of the EAC Region


 

Southern African Development Community (SADC)

Description

The SADC was first introduced as the SADCC (South African Development Coordinating Conference) in 1980, before becoming a fully-fledged community in 1992.

It is an inter-governmental organisation whose goal is to promote sustainable and equitable economic growth and socio-economic development through efficient productive systems, deeper co-operation and integration, good governance and durable peace and security among fifteen Southern African Member States.

The SADC encompasses 277 million people, a surface area of 554 919 sqkm, and boasts a GDP of $575.5 Billion.

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Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)

Description

Facts & figures

Full name: The Republic of Kenya

Population: 42.7 million (UN, 2012)

Capital: Nairobi

Area: 582,646 sq km (224,961 sq miles)

Major languages: Swahili, English

Major religion: Christianity

Life expectancy: 57 years (men), 59 years (women) (UN)

Monetary unit: 1 Kenya shilling = 100 cents

Main exports: Tea, coffee, horticultural products, petroleum products

GNI per capital: US $820 (World Bank, 2011)

Internet domain: .ke

International dialling code: +254

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Map of the EAC Region


 

Member States

  1. Burundi
  2. Kenya
  3. Rwanda
  4. Tanzania
  5. Uganda

History

A part of Southeast Africa, the territory of what is now Kenya has seen human habitation since the beginning of the Lower Paleolithic. The Bantu expansion from a West African center of dispersal reached the area by the 1st millennium AD. With the borders of the modern state at the crossroads of the Bantu, Nilo-Saharan and Afro-Asiatic ethno-linguistic areas of Africa, Kenya is a truly multi-ethnic state.

European and Arab presence in Mombasa dates to the Early Modern period, but European exploration of the interior began only in the 19th century. The British Empire established the East Africa Protectorate in 1895, from 1920 known as the Kenya Colony.

The independent Republic of Kenya was formed in 1964. It was ruled as a de facto single-party state by the Kenya African National Union (KANU), an alliance led by Jomo Kenyatta during 1963 to 1978. Kenyatta was succeeded by Daniel arap Moi, who ruled until 2002. Moi attempted to transform the de facto single-party status of Kenya into a de jure status during the 1980s, but with the end of the Cold War, the practices of political repression and torture which had been "overlooked" by the Western powers as necessary evils in the effort to contain communism were no longer tolerated.

Moi came under pressure, notably by US ambassador Smith Hempstone, to restore a multi-party system, which he did by 1991. Moi won elections in 1992 and 1997, which were overshadowed by political killings on both sides. During the 1990s, evidence of Moi's involvement in human rights abuses and corruption (Goldenberg scandal) was uncovered. He was constitutionally barred from running in the 2002 election, which was won by Mwai Kibaki. Widely reported electoral fraud on Kibaki's side in the 2007 elections resulted in the 2007–2008 Kenyan crisis.

Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS)

Description

Facts & figures

Full name: The Republic of Kenya

Population: 42.7 million (UN, 2012)

Capital: Nairobi

Area: 582,646 sq km (224,961 sq miles)

Major languages: Swahili, English

Major religion: Christianity

Life expectancy: 57 years (men), 59 years (women) (UN)

Monetary unit: 1 Kenya shilling = 100 cents

Main exports: Tea, coffee, horticultural products, petroleum products

GNI per capital: US $820 (World Bank, 2011)

Internet domain: .ke

International dialling code: +254

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