Namibia

Namibia

Facts & figures

Full name: The Republic of Namibia

Population: 2.4 million (UN, 2012)

Capital: Windhoek

Area: 824,292 sq km (318,261 sq miles)

Major languages: English (official), Afrikaans, German, Oshivambo, Herero, Nama

Major religion: Christianity

Life expectancy: 62 years (men), 63 years (women) (UN)

Monetary unit: 1 Namibian dollar = 100 cents

Main exports: Diamonds, copper, gold, zinc, lead, uranium, livestock

GNI per capita: US $4,700 (World Bank, 2011)

Internet domain: .na

International dialling code: +264



Map

 

Leader

 

President: Hifikepunye Pohamba

Mr Pohamba was a founding member of the rebel movement which fought for independence

Hifikepunye Pohamba, a founding member of the rebel movement which fought for his country's independence, won presidential elections in 2004 and again in November 2009.


Travel


Visa & travel advice

All visitors travelling to Namibia for business purposes need a Visa prior to travel. The business visa in Namibia is defined as the Visa issued to people looking for:

-prospects to set up formal business in Namibia,

-exploratory or fact-finding business missions,

-business people attending meetings at subsidiaries of their parent companies,

-Official government visits,

-Attending conferences, corporate events (not work) and meetings for which no remuneration is received,

-Charities, voluntary and expedition missions,

-Attending short training courses (not more than 90 days), sports events, expositions and trade fairs.

Visa Requirements for Foreigners travelling to Namibia

Nationals from the countries listed below are not required to obtain Visas to travel to Namibia on holiday for visits shorter than three months:

Angola

Ireland

Norway

Australia

Italy

Portugal

Austria

Japan

Russian Federation [**]

Belgium

Kenya

South Africa

Botswana

Lesotho

Singapore

Brazil

Liechtenstein

Spain

Canada

Luxembourg

Swaziland

Cuba

Macau (SAR)

Sweden

Denmark

Malaysia

Switzerland

Finland

Malawi

Tanzania

France

Mauritius

United Kingdom

Germany

Mozambique

United States of America

Hong Kong (SAR)

New Zealand

Zambia

Iceland

Netherlands

Zimbabwe

Also  the following States: Armenia, Azerbijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan

Visa Requirements for Namibians travelling abroad

Namibian Nationals do not require Visas when travelling to the countries listed below:

Angola

Lesotho

Switzerland

Botswana

Macau (SAR)

Tanzania

Brazil

Malawi

The Bahamas

Canada

Malaysia

Trinidad and Tobago

Cuba

Mauritius

United Kingdom

Ethiopia

Seychelles

Zambia

Germany

Singapore

Zimbabwe

Hong Kong (SAR)

South Africa

Kenya

Swaziland

  • Best period

The ideal time to visit Namibia is from June to November, when interior temperatures range from 65 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit (18.3 to 25 degrees Celcius) and you’re more likely to see plenty of game animals. Namibia’s rainy season lasts from October to April; during that time, average interior temperatures span 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21 to 32 degrees Celcius.) (In certain parts of the country, temperatures spike to more than 100 degrees (37.8 degrees Celcius) during this season.) If you’re traveling at the end of the rainy season, or you plan to camp outdoors, it’s advisable to bring a mosquito net and insect repellant with you. Malaria is not prevalent in this area, but having these on hand will make life a little easier.

  • Safety

Travelers looking to cross into Angola from Namibia should do so only at official border crossings. Crime directed at foreigners is unusual in Namibia, but travelers should still remain aware of their surroundings at all times. Look for taxis that display the Namibia Bus and Taxi Association (NABTA) logo.

The U.S. Department of State’s consular website has a great deal of information about safety and security in Namibia. It can’t be repeated often enough: be sensible when you travel. Be alert and aware of your surroundings.

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation has created a security ratings system called the Ibrahim Index, wherein scores are based on each country’s quality of government. Before traveling to Namibia or anywhere on the continent, check the index and do your research.

 

History

The history of Namibia has passed through several distinct stages from being colonised in the late nineteenth century to Namibia's independence on 21 March 1990.

From 1884, Namibia was a German colony: German South-West Africa. After the First World War, the League of Nations mandated South Africa to administer the territory. Following World War II, the League of Nations was dissolved in April 1946 and its successor, the United Nations, instituted a Trusteeship system to bring all of the former German colonies in Africa under UN control. South Africa objected arguing that a majority of the territory's people were content with South African rule.

Legal argument ensued over the course of the next twenty years until, in October 1966, the UN General Assembly decided to end the mandate, declaring that South Africa had no other right to administer the territory and that henceforth South-West Africa was to come under the direct responsibility of the UN (Resolution 2145 XXI of 27 October 1966).

Arts & Culture

  • Music :

The music of Namibia has a number of folk styles, as well as pop, rock, reggae, jazz, house and hip hop. The Sanlam-NBC Music Awards and the Namibian Music Awards are two separate institutions that give out annual awards at shows on December 2 and May 6 respectively [3]. The Namibia Society of Composers and Authors of Music (NASCAM) has helped promote Namibian music within and outside the country, but despite this, the Namibian music industry remains undeveloped, with no major record labels or distribution infrastructure.[4] A lack of focus to produce economically viable Namibian music products and the absence of effective marketing and distribution structures are two of the factors inherently hampering the development of the local music industry.

 

  • Literature :

Namibian Writer Profile: Neshani Andreas

Neshani Andreas was born in 1964 in Walvis Bay, Namibia’s most important port city. At this time in Namibia’s history, it was a colony of South Africa, subject to discriminatory aparteid laws. Neshani’s parents worked in a fish factory and raised eight children. Neshani trained as a teacher at Ongwediva Training College and taught English, history, and business economics from 1988 to 1992 in a school in rural northern Namibia, where her first novel The Purple Violet of Oshaantu is set. Neshani completed this novel soon after her move to Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, where she went to take a post-graduate degree in education at the newly established University of Namibia While working part-time with the American Peace Corps, Neshani met a Peace Corps volunteer, Reed Dickson, who read her early writing and encouraged her to continue. Neshani said: “This was one of the most treasured moments in my life. I had met the first person in my life who showed interest and understanding in my writing.’

  • Famous monuments

GIBEON METEORITE NATIONAL MONUMENT

 

HEROES ACRE

 

HOBA METEORITE

 

  • Architecture history

Most of central and southern Namibia, an area formerly known as the Police Zone, was appropriated for white settlement. Today it consists of large commercial farms and widely scattered towns with Western-style buildings, some distinctly German. In the rural communal areas (former ethnic homelands), there are a variety of architectural styles in addition to Western buildings. Construction materials include sticks and logs, earth, and thatch. Houses may be round, square, or beehive-shaped; in some areas, clusters of huts are enclosed in wooden palisades. Some dwellings and shops are also made of metal sheets or concrete blocks with metal roofs, a style also seen in some urban neighborhoods.

 

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